Top 3 Personal Finance Tips

I’ve answered the golden question many times in my classes and presentations: “What is the number one suggestion you have for financial success?” In all honesty, don’t we already live in a society that’s plenty busy and plenty complicated already? Why throw on our shoulders another five, ten or twenty financial skills to master?

Each time I answer the question, though, it’s within the context of a specific course topic, whether it’s budgeting, using credit wisely, or getting out and staying out of debt. Consequently, three different people in three different classes have heard me provide three different #1 suggestions.

1. Write down your financial goals.

It’s true that every journey starts with one step. I also love the expression, “An unwritten goal is just a dream.” However, I am not referring to massive, long-term goals. We can’t relate our day-to-day financial choices to goals that are more than 3 years away or that require more than probably $1,000. For large goals, you’ll need to break them down into monthly, if not weekly, savings required to reach the goal.

Regardless of nature of your goal, you should write down the following: 1) What you want to achieve, purchase, or do with money, 2) How much money you project you will need all together, 3) What month and year you plan to achieve the goal, and 4) How much you’ll need to save each month/week/paycheck from now until the time you plan to reach the goal.

2. Pay yourself first.

Once you have suggestion #1 in place, suggestion #2 becomes both easier and more meaningful. Without #1 in place, #2 because a chore and will likely not last or produce any significant results.

Set up an automated deposit, ideally directly from your paycheck but otherwise from your checking account, into your savings and investments accounts. Even if it’s just $5 per month or paycheck to start with, consistency is much more important than the amount you transfer to savings. Once the money is out of your checking account, you’ll be much more likely to live within your remaining income and will probably not even miss the money placed into savings.

3. Pay ALL your bills ON TIME and IN FULL.

So much time and energy is wasted in discussing what makes up good credit, what credit is, and what it’s used for, that many people overlook the simple fact that online payments every month is the simplest and most effective way to build a solid credit score.

Before figuring out the best way to pay down debts or determining how many credit cards you should carry in order to have the best credit score, remember that credit is a reflection of your financial habits with regards to debts and accounts for which you are responsible. As such, your credit score is an indication of your credit reputation. Paying your bills on time as agreed is the surest way to protect your credit reputation. Defaulting on your payments or making a late payment is basically an indirect way of telling your creditor that paying that as you agreed is not very important to you. Consequently, they will tell other creditors of your actions (that’s what a credit report is), impacting your credit reputation.

Although paying down debts and avoiding a “maxed out” card is nearly as important, no one can argue that on time payments (even they are just the minimum payments required by the creditor) make up the most influential portion of your credit score.

So, there you have them: my top three personal finance tips of all time. Hopefully they make your life, your parenting techniques, and your overall well being a bit easier and much less complicated.

If you have any suggestions or stories on how you’ve experienced relief from credit cards and other debt feel free to share in the comment section below. Tips, tricks and other suggestions are always welcome!

1-877-OUT-DEBT (688-3328)

www.debtreductionservices.org

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